What is Autism?

Autism is a developmental disability characterized by serious deficits in the areas of nonverbal and verbal communication, social skill development, and age-appropriate play skills. Individuals with autism often demonstrate significantly restricted ranges of behavior and interests. These deficits prevent them from interacting with, and learning from, others around them and are at increased risk of developing behavior problems such as aggression and self-injury.

Statistics

Approximately 1 in 54 children have been identified as being diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)*.

NJ has the highest prevalence rate in the nation, with approximately 1 in 32 children being diagnosed with an ASD.

The rate of an ASD diagnosis is 4-5 times more common in boys than girls

Autism does not discriminate, spreading equally across ethnic, racial, and social groups.

Although individuals with an ASD share some common behavioral characteristics, each child with autism is unique and his/her family situation is unique. What is common is that all of these individuals and their families will need support. Research has documented that intensive behavioral intervention at an early age leads to significant and long-lasting change in the lives of individuals with autism.

What your donation means to the students at IEA

Every day at the Institute for Educational Achievement, children who could not speak are talking. Children who were shy or frightened are asking for hugs. Students who could not function in the world are going to birthday parties and playgrounds with their friends and family members. Some students make such significant progress that they are able to graduate and go on to attend public and private schools within their own communities. Also, adolescents and adults successfully acquire skills that allow them to participate in vocational settings and become valued members of the workforce. Families, once devastated by this diagnosis, are now able to go to the movies, out to dinner, or on vacation. For these families, IEA has turned despair into hope, and the future into something to look forward to. The intervention provided to students at IEA is highly effective, but also extremely expensive. As a result, we depend on the generosity of individuals, corporations, and foundations for financial support. Your donation to IEA allows us to forever change the lives of children, adolescents, and adults with autism.

Donate Today.

Our donations are vital to the success of IEA and the students who rely on our services. By making a donation to IEA, you are directly affecting the life of an individual with autism. Through the generosity and support of our contributors, IEA will continue to help individuals with autism overcome the challenges they face each and every day.

Other Methods of Support:

Check

Make a donation to IEA by mailing a check to:
Institute for Educational Achievement
381 Madison Avenue
New Milford, NJ 07646

Corporate matching

Strengthen your donation with a matching gift from your corporation by mailing a matching gift program form along with your donation.

Inheritance

Make a bequest or gift of securities by contacting us at (201) 262-3287.

Memorial

Honor someone special or his/her special event by making a donation in his/her name.

Beyond Monetary

Donate toys, appliances, services, or equipment to the education program.

Fundraising Events

Join us in our fundraising campaign by supporting upcoming events through participation and attendance at the event.

The Institute for Educational Achievement is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. As such, all contributions are tax deductible, as allowed by law. If you would like additional information about how to support IEA and help our students achieve all that they can, contact us at (201) 262-3287.

*According to the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM)

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CoVid19 update
During these unprecedented times, IEA is committed to ensuring the health and safety of all staff and students based upon the guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Education (DOE), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), and Department of Health (DOH). 
For information on IEA’s Protocol for Returning to In-Person Instruction following a Health-Related School Closure, click the link below.